Recent studies have confirmed significant health improvements are possible for currently inactive seniors who engage in regular daily walking. Many seniors face challenges with stability, weather and safety and remain inactive as a result. TrekDesk Treadmill Desks allow seniors more stability and a safe, climate neutral environment translating into a greater chance at successful health maintenance.

A critical study out of the University of Georgia shows overall physical function scores of elderly walkers aged 60 and over increased more than 25% combined with a decrease in disability risk of 41%. Cognitive scores tested at the University of Illinois also showed great promise within this age group with 15% increases in memory and mental abilities in just a six month time frame. Aerobic capacities measured by the University of Georgia study increased 19%.

“Perhaps the best exercise it the one that people with stick with and walking rates at the top of the list,” states Steve Bordley, CEO of TrekDesk Treadmill Desks. “TrekDesk offers a unique advantage allowing seniors to walk regardless of weather or time of day right in the comfort of their own home.”

The last of the baby boomer generation is now 55 years of age or older and often struggle with the demands of strength training programs, losing interest and remaining inactive. Walking needs to be promoted as a valuable means of maintaining health to this population.

="We know that walking is good for you, but too many people still aren't doing it," University of Georgia researcher Trudy Moore-Harrison stated in a news release. "This study shows that just walking on a regular basis can make a huge impact on quality of life."Designed to fit any existing treadmill, TrekDesk is an affordable, full sized workstation allowing individuals the opportunity to gain the necessary amount of exercise daily to maintain health, prevent disease, strengthen muscles, boost mood and productivity, without requiring additional time during the day or extra motivation.

 University of Georgia study results are published in the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.