Summary:  Scientists have long known that walking dramatically reduces the risk of heart attacks if practiced on a regular and sufficient basis. A new study out of Emory University shows not only that the heart can be protected from further injury if a heart attack does occur, but how walking may be a critical component to the process. TrekDesk treadmill desks help to keep employees heart healthy and moving throughout the day.

On the heels of studies showing that heart attack sufferers benefit more from relatively immediate exercise regimens than from periods of rest is another study from Emory University showing that exercise, such as walking, not only reduces the risk of initial heart attacks but also mitigates further heart damage in the event that one occurs. Unfortunately, the average American employee walks less than ½ the amount of steps necessary to maintain heart health. TrekDesk Treadmill Desks offer a unique solution to keep them healthier moving throughout the day.

Researchers at Emory University recently published their findings in the journal Circulation Research identifying exercise as a key component in the heart’s ability to produce and store nitric oxide, critical to protecting the heart from injury.

Senior researcher, Dr. David Lefer director of the Cardiothoracic Research Laboratory at Emory University Hospital Midtown commented on the importance of the findings, "Our study provides new evidence that nitric oxide generated during physical exercise is actually stored in the bloodstream and heart in the form of nitrite and nitrosothiols. These more stable nitric oxide intermediates appear to be critical for the cardio-protection against a subsequent heart attack.”

Nitric oxide, produced within the body, assists in the relaxation of blood vessels increasing blood flow and engaging survival mechanisms within the heart in the event of failures such as lack of blood flow or oxygen to the heart. Nitric Oxide however is a short- lived gas, so consistent regular exercise is critical to keeping its levels available to the body in the event of a cardiac crisis.

The researchers found that exercise increased levels of an enzyme which produces nitric oxide (endothelial nitric oxide synthase, or eNos). Levels of eNos in heart tissue and nitrite and nitrosothiols (forms of nitric oxide stored in the blood) while remaining high for a one week period lost their protective effects within four weeks of inactivity.

“The human and economic costs of Inactivity, a state of being in today’s work environment, are greatly underestimated in our society,” stated Steve Bordley, CEO of TrekDesk Treadmill Desks. “Some simple modifications to our lifestyles and work environments which encourage movement would eliminate many of these escalating health risks.”